Chronicles

Today is the Day

Patreon-Announcement

Today is the day that launch a new way of getting more books and stories out to you all. I know it’s taken me a while but you can now join my Patreon page (patreon.com/dncwrites) to get everything from unpublished (meaning never hitting this blog) short stories and poems, extra scenes, book previews of my upcoming two books and so much more.

It’s time for me to push myself and my passion so that I can live the fiction writing lifestyle I’ve always dreamt of. There are many roads to get to that dream, most of which take a decade to fulfilled but you know–I’m too ambitious and focused to wait that damn long. I’m working to make it come true now and your support will help to get me there faster and books in your hands sooner.

What I do, the words and stories that I write are not just a “thing” for me. It’s so damn fulfilling that I’m willing to just throw myself out there and see where God points me next.

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Even though it would be so dope to quit my day job and just do this full-time, it’s not realistic…yet. So in the meantime, I giving you all, my passion-fy family, exclusive stories that have been catching dust on my hard drive and real uncensored videos and post about life stuff, just not writing tips, and then, when we hit a goal or two, I’m dropping my podcast!

So as you can see, I’ve listened to your requests and as promised I’ve figured out something that works sooner than later.

Go and visit my page, and if you’re ready, there is already a story, or two waiting for you!

With passion and gratitude,

DNC

P.S. Patreon is for my 18+ years and older family 🙂 You know what that means.

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A Mother’s Thoughts

My daughters teach me every day that it’s okay not to be perfect. I wake up daily wondering how to do more, talk more and be there more for them, even though they don’t ask for it. In my spinning mind, there’s always something more that I can, something more I should do, even if I had no inkling of what that “more” is. I’m not going to lie, it makes me wondering how good of a mother I can be if I never feel like I hit the mark.

But every day, my three beautiful girls still love me. Whether it’s through a silence hug or a smile at one of my uncool comments or even in an eye roll as I ask for the third time for something to be done, they accept me as I am – flaws and all. Even through all the imperfections and the gaps I feel like I need to fill constantly, those issues don’t seem to effect how they look at me.

What a beautiful gesture. It’s the reason why I won’t stop trying to be best mother to them even if perfection is truly impossible – which I know it probably is. I won’t stop striving for a life where I can focus more on them, than on a job. My passion for writing will lead me down avenues that will take me closer to them, soon than I know. I can feel it and the most importantly, I simply believe it.

I was once told that I was anointed to be a mother of girls, and today, and every Mother’s Day, that thought fills my soul. It is a blessing and I will never take it lightly. Thank you, God!

Happy Mother’s Day to all of you wonderful biological and non-biological mothers, grandmothers, aunts, and Godmothers out there. You were destined for your role. God and your kids believe in you, even when you don’t. Find peace in that today and enjoy the love.

One motherly love to you all!

DNC

She’s Been Picked up for Two Years Straight!

Yes, yes! Part II of my YA fiction story was picked up by Z Publishing. Yes, that makes two consecutive years that my short stories have been selected for their anthology. My first story, Beauty Hurts selected for their Georgia’s Emerging Writers: Anthology of Fiction series was published last year. This year, “What She Deserves” made it into their America’s Emerging Young Adult Writers: Deep South series this year.

I’m so blessed to have this opportunity to not only have a publisher believe in my work  but also to cross-over into another genre that I love. Purchase your copy, or any book, through the links below and I get see a few coins (God is grand). #SupportIndieAuthors

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Published 2019; Featured story “What She Deserves”

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Published 2018; Featured story, “Beauty Hurts”

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I appreciate you all and your continue support!

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Hard Facts about Being an African American Romance Writer

I read an article today that resonates so well with my writing journey that I have to share it, vlog it, and just sit on it for a moment.

It’s a #Longread from the Guardian title “Fifty Shade of White: the long fight against racism in romance novels“. The writer of this piece, Lois Beckett, dives right into the past and current issues with romance writers of color; it’s hard to break through when the industry is slow to see that change it needs.

As it stands, when it comes to the Rita Award, one of the most prestigious awards in the romance industry given by RWA (Romance Writers of America), there has never been a black winner, like ever. The first official RWA meeting occurred Dec. 1980 – yep not one winner for the past 40 years. But to be honest, as a black woman, I’m not shocked. I grew up watching black romance books being separated from all the others to fall into an Urban Romance category. Segregation comes in many forms, and that my friend, is one of them. I remember never being able to find them, they were always tucked somewhere in the back, as if a white woman with a flowing dress falling off of her shoulders with a guy raising her leg was so much more sophisticated than a black woman’s eyes or lips.

It was then that I picked up my first Zane book and got lost between the pages. Her words reminded me that the black POV of love and lust were different but still viable for all that read it. Zane inspired me to write my own romance stories, using imagery and words that resonated with my generation and my friends. She gave me the courage to go about this writing journey in my own way.

Fast forward to now, as I continue to push my own voice through my writing and pitch an African American romance, women’s fiction, upmarket/commercial erotic fiction book (it may fall into to some other categories but I didn’t want to go overboard), I’m wondering if there will be a delay in understanding the worth and message behind my words. My romance looks and reads differently, but it feels as good as other romance stories. Can a predominately white industry recognize its value? It’s in Beckett’s article that I find some hope that it will. I just pray that it’s sooner than later…I’m so ready to take this passion on full-time.

Here’s an excerpt from Beckett’s article:

For all this diversity of genre, the romance industry itself has remained overwhelming white, as have the industry’s most prestigious awards ceremony, the Ritas, which are presented each year by the RWA. Just like the Oscars in film, a Rita award is the highest honour a romance author can receive, and winning can mean not only higher sales, but also lasting recognition from peers. And just like the Oscars, the Ritas have become the centre of controversy over unacknowledged racism and bias in the judging process.

Last year, however, many observers felt that this was sure to change. One of the standout novels of 2017 had been Alyssa Cole’s An Extraordinary Union, an interracial romance set during the civil war. The book had already won a number of awards and made multiple best-of-the-year lists.

When the Rita awards finalists were announced in March 2018, An Extraordinary Union was nowhere to be seen. A novel rated exceptional by critics had been not even been deemed as noteworthy by an anonymous judging panel of Cole’s fellow romance writers. The books that had beat Cole as finalists in the best short historical romance category were all by white women, all but one set in 19th-century Britain, featuring white women who fall in love with aristocrats. The heroes were, respectively, one “rogue”, two dukes, two lords and an earl.

What followed, on Twitter, was an outpouring of grief and frustration from black authors and other authors of colour, describing the racism they had faced again and again in the romance industry. They talked about white editors assuming black writers were aspiring authors, even after they had published dozens of books; about white authors getting up from a table at the annual conference when a black author came to sit down; about constant questions from editors and agents about whether black or Asian or Spanish-speaking characters could really be “relatable” enough.

Then, of course, there were the readers. “People say: ‘Well, I can’t relate,’” Jenkins told NPR a few years ago, after watching white readers simply walk past her table at a book signing. “You can relate to shapeshifters, you can relate to vampires, you can relate to werewolves, but you can’t relate to a story written by and about black Americans?”

Read the full article.