She’s Been Picked up for Two Years Straight!

Yes, yes! Part II of my YA fiction story was picked up by Z Publishing. Yes, that makes two consecutive years that my short stories have been selected for their anthology. My first story, Beauty Hurts selected for their Georgia’s Emerging Writers: Anthology of Fiction series was published last year. This year, “What She Deserves” made it into their America’s Emerging Young Adult Writers: Deep South series this year.

I’m so blessed to have this opportunity to not only have a publisher believe in my work  but also to cross-over into another genre that I love. Purchase your copy, or any book, through the links below and I get see a few coins (God is grand). #SupportIndieAuthors

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Published 2019; Featured story “What She Deserves”

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Published 2018; Featured story, “Beauty Hurts”

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I appreciate you all and your continue support!

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Bad Grammar that Feels So Good!

Photo by Marion Michele on Unsplash

So, I just found out that March 4 was National Grammar Day. Yes, I didn’t make that up. In 2008, Martha Brokenbrough, founder of the Society for the Promotion of Good Grammar (SPOGG), established the day to celebrate the one thing that kids hate and writers adore — good grammar.

Let’s celebrate the joys of grammar by reflect on how it’s changed. I pulled the 11 terms  from Merriam-Webster online that are no longer deemed “Bad Grammer.” But, do we agree? Let me know what you think.

11 Common Terms That Used To Be “Bad Grammar”

  1. Above
    Both the adjective in “the above explanation” and the noun in “the above is an explanation” annoyed plenty of folks in the 19th and 20th centuries.
  2. Aggravate
    The “to rouse to displeasure or anger by usually persistent and often petty goading” meaning aggravated critics from the late 1800s through much of the 20th century—despite the fact that the meaning dates to the early 1600s.
  3. Balding
    It was new in 1938 and disliked until it proved too useful.
  4. Craft
    The verb, as in “crafting a poem,” wasn’t common until the late 20th century, when people spurned it as an upstart. But it actually dates to the 15th century.
  5. Debut
    The verb in our above (ahem) sentence “National Grammar Day debuted in 2008” was frowned upon throughout the 20th century, and a transitive version like “Martha Brockenbrough debuted National Grammar Day in 2008” was considered even worse.
  6. Finalize
    It was common in Australia and New Zealand in the 1920s, but an object of derision in the U.S. for a long time.
  7. Mentality
    This word as used to mean “mode or way of thought” or “outlook” bothered some folks of a stodgy mentality in the early 20th century.
  8. Out loud
    For much of the 20th century, you’d be criticized for reporting that something was said “out loud” rather than “aloud.”
  9. Transpire
    Using this to mean “to happen” a hundred years ago was a big no-no.
  10. Upcoming
    The word was new in the 1940s and condemned by some as “journalese.”
  11. Won’t
    It was described as “absolutely vulgar” (along with ain’t) in an 1846 address to high school students—criticism that was piled onto more than a century of previous objections.

A Thanksgiving Love Note: Love’s Blessing

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Happy Thanksgiving!

with passion,

DNC

 

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Like. Love. Lust. is a story told through prose, sonnets, narratives, and long-form stanzas, speak to the beauty in discovering each emotion, and battle with the complexities of their natural course, also known as human nature.

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Back at it…YouTubing that is

Do you ever run out of stuff to write about…yeah me neither but sometimes, I get tired of typing so I’m restarting my channel on YouTube. Yep that’s right, I’m sharing spur of the moment thoughts about all things pertaining to a writer’s life in hopefully under three minutes!

Check it out. Subscribe or just like a video or two. I hope to inspire you to keep pushing and letting the words flow. And maybe make you laugh a little along the way.