Book Review: Nervous by Zane

The key to being a great writer is to be an avid reader, which is why I’ve been trying to consume more books, particularly romance books, throughout the month. My schedule doesn’t allow me the sit-down-and-turn-a-page time, so even though I absolutely love to hold a great book, I’ve had to invest in Audible to help me reach monthly literary desires. And I can honestly say, I have no buyer’s remorse!

Since I’m getting back to old habits–reading one book a month–I’ve decided to start a weekly #WednesdayWords post that’ll be dedicated to the words, albums, songs or even shows that I’m digging. It’s all about introducing you all to what I like, love and lust (see what I did there–Go check out my LLL book) for.

For today’s #WednesdayWords, I’m reminiscing over the steamy and intense storyline from a book I finished earlier this month, title Nervous by Zane.

Yes I know, I’m a Zane fanatic. She’s the author that showed me it was okay to write how I feel sexually, truly teaching me how to let my imagination fly to new heights. And this book did not disappoint, so let’s get into it.

Medium of Choice

I took in this novel through audible, which ran about 7 hours and 30 minutes, and with the audio version comes some great sound effects. It was like taking in a serial scripted podcast and me likie it a lot! I do plan to order a paperback copy though so I can reread it at my leisure. I lust to put my eyes on dope words as much as in my ears.

Quick Synopsis

A docile and virgin woman, Jonquinette, is haunted and ravaged by a being she knows of but doesn’t want to accept; her split personality Jude. Jude is a “hoe” in her own terms who will do anything to protect Jonquinette, even if it means beating people to a pulp and breaking up Jonquinette family. This is the first book I’ve read that dissects the complexities of Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), which is now called Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), and places it front and center in the word of sex addiction. Not to give too many spoilers away, but Jude isn’t the only person protecting Jonquinette. As we learn about the vast differences between the two personalities, at some point, I began to wonder who was the “main” character and if she would or could overcome the others. It’s definitely hits the girl finds guy and trys to figure out how they can make this last forever trope but of course the twist is how can they do so if her “Hyde” was sleeping with and fucking up everything else in her life (sorry, I had a little Jude fall out there).

This book is actually apart of a series that based around the psychiatrist Dr. Marcella Spencer and I can’t wait to read the next one.

Hot Spot

There were SO many hot ass scenes in this book but there is one in particular that stands out to me based on how she wrote through this media. It was midway through the book when Jude is still holding tight to her virginity but engages in a raw online sex chat with a man. No lie, when the scene first started I was mad because she’s just a teenager talking like that, but then after a while I was like, well at least she’s not out there doing what she’s typing at this age. The way Zane moves between their online chat names and their raunchy exchange will make you want to see if conversations really go like that in chat rooms. Ironically, I grew up during a time when online sex chatting was shifting in popularity to free porn sites so this perspective was a bit nostalgic for me.

Steam Index

I give this one a five-alarm flame index. Even though this may have been published in 2003, and some of the terms may have been more trendy then rather than now, the passion and pleasure behind the words in this book are damn near perfection. It really takes you through Jonquinette/Jude’s inner battles and external glories. It really makes me wonder if we all have a little Jude in us.

I would recommend this book to anyone who has read erotica before and is looking for a new character arc to get into. I will warn those who do not read erotica at all or on a regular basis: this type of introduction may be like getting shock treatment into the genre. You’ll either enjoy it or run away.

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